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20131028
20131105
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
>> embroiled in an embarrassing spy scandal, president obama may order the n.s.a. to stop eaves dropping on the leaders of american allies, stripping the agency of some of its powers. >> a pakistan. >> i family that lost their grandmother to a drone strike is on capitol hill to tell their story. first, they share it with aljazeera america. >> sex crimes on campus, surprising new research that the majority of attacks on campus of committed by repeat offenders. >> it's hard breaking. >> it was heart wrenching. >> one year after hurricane sandy, some families still have not been able to pic pick up the pieces. why an insurance loophole is preventing some from rebuilding their storm-ravaged homes. >> good morning. welcome to august america. it's great to have you with us. i'm stephanie sy. >> i'm thomas day den. the national security agency is now under fire here at home. >> both the president and congress are considering changes that would limit the n.s.a.'s sweeping ability to collect intelligence. >> words like constraint, transparency and increased oversight are now used when ta
the "wall street journal report"ed he did learn this summer the nsa was bugging phones of german chancellor angela merkel and other world leaders for nearly five years. followed by a few claims of hhs sebelius obama didn't know about problems of the health care website before the launch. the white house frequently has given a variation on this theme. the question, what did obama know and when did he know it? answer not much and about a minute ago. i mean not much and about a minute ago. and so now we're hearing that from other people that he did know for five years that angela merkel and allies have been -- i mean this is bad. >> the length of time that the program has been under operation or at least the lent of time it has been published with various world leaders. if he did not know, if you choose to believe the president of the united states and i believe the president of the united states, i want to believe the president of the united states. >> some reports suggest he signed off on it. >> if he did not know why didn't he know? the larger question is do we have an out of control nation
the n.s.a. did it behind their backs. a brand-new bombshell on the growing n.s.a. scandal. >> just six months after the boston bombing, the red sox show boston is indeed strong. >> at fenway park, it hasn't happened for 95 years. the red sox world champion. >> that was joe buck and that was the red sox. their third championship this century is off to a good start. a surprising start. live reaction this horning. i believe the car was once on its wheels. "fox & friends" starts now. >> this is curt schilling. you're watching "fox & friends." >> one of the neighbor kids is fiddling with the light switch. >> happy halloween everybody. >> that's right. today we're going to dress up. by the end of the day we're going to be dressed up as something or somebody. we'll all be part of a theme. who do you think it is? give a guess. you can e-mail us at friends@foxnews.com or go to twitter or facebook us. you can also send us pictures, if you like to dress up or your kids. >> it's been hallow-week, not just halloween. >> if kids have a bunch of parties, they want a different costume for each party.
by the n.s.a. because a few numbers may solve an authorized investigation. supporters of bulk collection practices have defended this program as an important tool in the fight against terror. they have said that this is a mechanism to access the logs quickly and they are not actually listening to the content. president obama even said, and i'll quote, "when it comes to telephone calls, nobody is listening to your telephone call. instead, the government was just sifting through this so-called met aadata" madam president, the president is right. they are not listening to the actual calls like the f.b.i. conducting a wire tavment but let me outline that the government can figure out what is going on i from those call logs. for example, they will know that an american citizen in nevada received a call from the local n.r.a. office and then called their representative and senators. but they claim that the content of that call remains safe from government intrusion. or they'll also know that a nevadan from las vegas called a suicide prevention hotline and spoke to an individual for 12 minutes.
countries. the resolution is expected to be voted on later this month. >> n.s.a. leader edward snowden is speaking up and reaching out. the germans are interested in bringing him to berlin if he tells them about the surveillance of german chancellor angela merkel. >> david chater reports from moscow. >> edward snowden shows every sign of going native. the snapshot showing him enjoying a river cruise in moscow. he held a meeting with an mp from the green party. he said their discussions were revealing. at a press conference the mp said edward snowden would about willing to go germany as a witness to the bugging of angela merkel's phone by the u.s. >> translation: he told me he could imagine coming to germany if it was clear he could remain here in safety. this means granting free passage and asylum. the interior minister could offer this and fulfil the moral obligation to help him. >> it's reported edward snowden is starting a job in st. petersburg as a technical advisor to russia's version of facebook. he may not be happy with the news that the federal security service in moscow is be
-ed in "the l.a. times." you called for changes to be made to the nsa's massive phone data gathering program and say it's the evidence that it has made us safer is limited. instead it appears that the utility of the metadata program has been conflated with the success of other collection efforts. how do you determine how much surveillance, then, is too much? >> i think we have to weigh what is the size of the program, what is the magnitude of the collection and what are the results it's getting? and even more than that, even if it met that test, even if the metadata program was very successful, we also have to ask, is it necessary to collect all this data or can the program be restructured? in my view, the program can be restructured in a way that has the telecommunications providers retain their own data. i doesn't require the government to get all that data. when we suspect that a phone number is connected to a plot, then we go to the phone company, much as we would do in a criminal investigation. so i think we can get the same information we need. we can continue to protect the country. w
on with the national security agency. mr. secretary, to start with you, because you jointly oversea the nsa and as a senior member of the national security committee, clearly, this is in your portfolio as well, so what did you know about collection of intelligence from world leaders communications whether it was data or whatever it was, what did you know about it? when did you know about it, and have you discussed it with the president and feel it appropriate? why is it appropriate? mr. minister, how worried is your government that the united states is intercepting communications, and what does this do to new zealand's trust with the u.s.. first, mr. secretary. >> barbara, i don't discuss conversations i have in national security counsel meetings. i certainly don't discuss publicly conversations that we have regarding intelligence. we are examining dynamics out there and procedures and processes, i think, the white house has been very clear on that; and i think those who lead intelligence community even very clear on that. we have great respect for our partners, allies who cooperate with us
-- ns -- n.s.a. and sinced at administration has said there was unspecified inaccuracies in these reports about the revelations, can you say that that was what you were talking about? >> you want to specify what the unspecified inaccuracies might be? we have important cooperative relationships with the security agencies and intelligence agencies of other nations, of allied nations. i'm not going to get into the specific alleged activities, intelligence activities, of the united states or our allies. we're obviously more broadly engaged in a review as i discussed at length yesterday of our intelligence gathering activities, mindful of the fact that because of the explosion in our technological capacities , we need to look at and make sure that we are not just gathering intelligence because we can, but we're gathering it because we need it specifically and that review is under way at the president's direction and will be completed by the end of the year. >> one of the things that officials say of the review is the surveillance of allied heads of state. is the administration
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)